Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Psychiatry – What should the Psychiatrist know?

Posted on March 14, 2016

PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and consists of anovulation or menstrual dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. The main criteria are hyperandrogenism, anovulation and ovarian cysts. 2 out of 3 are required for diagnosis after other causes are excluded. In Australia, it affects 11% of Australian women of reproductive age and 21% of indigenous women. Australian research shows that 89% of women with PCOS saw more than one health professional before their diagnosis was made, 49% took greater than six months to have a diagnosis confirmed. The economic burden of PCOS is approximately $400 million per year in Australia.

 

References

ROTTERDAM CRITERIA

PCOS Consensus Workshop Group. Rotterdam ESHRE/ASRM-Sponsored PCOS Consensus Workshop Group. Revised 2003 consensus on diagnostic criteria and long-term health risks related to polycystic ovary syndrome. Fertil Steril. Jan 2004;81(1):19-25

Common treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome and major depressive disorder: case report and review

Rasgon, N. L., Carter, M. S., Elman, S., Bauer, M., Love, M., & Korenman, S. G. (2002). Common treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome and major depressive disorder: case report and review. Current drug targets. Immune, endocrine and metabolic disorders, 2(1), 97.

PCOS Criteria and Clinical Features

Teede HJ, Misso ML, Deeks AA, et al. Assessment and management of polycystic ovary syndrome: summary of an evidence-based guideline. Med J Aust 2011;195:S65–112.

PCOS
Teede, H., Deeks, A., & Moran, L. (2010). Polycystic ovary syndrome: a complex condition with psychological, reproductive and metabolic manifestations that impacts on health across the lifespan. BMC medicine, 8(1), 41.