Computerized Speech Analysis – An Objective Marker for Psychiatry?

Posted on September 16, 2016

Sir William Osler may have been predicting the future when he said: “Listen to your patient, he is telling you the diagnosis.” Analyzing what our patients say, and how they say it, may become the next game-changer in mental health diagnosis and treatment.

References

1. An examination of the language construct in NIMH's research domain criteria

Elvevåg, B., Cohen, A. S., Wolters, M. K., Whalley, H. C., Gountouna, V. E., Kuznetsova, K. A., … & Nicodemus, K. K. (2016). An examination of the language construct in NIMH’s research domain criteria: Time for reconceptualization!. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics.

3. Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies

Poushter, J. (2016). Smartphone Ownership and Internet Usage Continues to Climb in Emerging Economies. Pew Research Center: Global Attitudes & Trends.

4. Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths

Bedi, Gillinder, et al. “Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths.” npj Schizophrenia 1 (2015): 15030. This study is summarised in this article.

5. Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder

Faurholt-Jepsen, M., et al. “Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder.” Translational Psychiatry 6.7 (2016): e856.

6. Large-scale Analysis of Counseling Conversations: An Application of Natural Language Processing to Mental Health

Althoff, T., Clark, K., & Leskovec, J. (2016). Large-scale Analysis of Counseling Conversations: An Application of Natural Language Processing to Mental Health. Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics,4, 463-476.